Study Plan

A. Social Psychology (42 Credit Hours)

​Semester

​Course Title 

​Course Code

​Credit Hours



First Semester​ ​


 ​

Research Methods

​PSYC611

​​3 Credit Hours 

​Advanced Social Psychology

​PSYC611

​​3 Credit Hours 

​English for Psychology

​​PSYC001

0 Credit Hours

​Free Course

​-

​​3 Credit Hours 




Second Semester​ ​




​Statistical Methods for Graduates

​PSYC612

​​3 Credit Hours

​Current Issues in Social & Applied Psychology

​PSYC620

​​​​3 Credit Hours

​Social Change & Influence

​PSYC622

​​3 Credit Hours 

​Elective Course

​-

​​3 Credit Hours 




​Third Semester 
 ​

​Internship

​PSYC624

​​3 Credit Hours

​Advanced Applied Statistics

​PSYC681

​​​​3 Credit Hours

Elective Course

-

​​​​3 Credit Hours

Free Course

3 Credit Hours​


​Fourth Semester


Free Course

​-

​​3 Credit Hours

​Dissertation in Social Psychology

​PSYC699B

​6 Credit Hours


Total Credit Hours

​ 

​ 42 Credit Hours


B. Clinical Psychology (45 Credit Hours)

​Semester
​Course Title 
Course Code​
​Credit Hours


First Semester​ ​


 ​

Research Methods

​​PSYC611

​3 Credit Hours 

​​PSYC613

​​3 Credit Hours 

Psychopathology: Adulthood

​PSYC615A

​3 Credit Hours 

​Clinical Assessment - Personality/Psychosocial

​​PSYC617A

​3 Credit Hours 

English for Psychology

​​​PSYC001

​​​​0 Credit Hour




Second Semester​ ​






​Statistical Methods for Graduates 

​​PSYC612

​​3 Credit Hours 

Psychopathology: Childhood & Adolescence

​PSYC615B

​​3 Credit Hours 

Clinical Interventions I

​​PSYC621A

​​3 Credit Hours 

Clinical Assessment: Cognitive

​​PSYC623A

​3 Credit Hours 





​Third Semester 
 ​

​Clinical Practicum 1

​PSYC623A

​1.5 Credit Hours

Biological Bases of Psychopathology (Neuroscience of Mental Disorders)

​​PSYC619

​​​3 Credit Hours

Clinical Interventions II

​PSYC621B

​​​​3 Credit Hours

Free Course 

​- 

​​​​3 Credit Hours



​Fourth Semester





Clinical Practicum (1.5 credits)
​​PSYC623B
​1.5 Credit Hours

Elective Course

​-

​​​​3 Credit Hours

​​Dissertation in Clinical Psychology

​PSYC699A

​​6 Credit Hours

Total Credit Hours


​ 45 Credit Hours


 Elective Courses

PSYC641 Political Psychology

This course is intended to provide an introductory graduate-level survey of some content, theories, and findings in political psychology. The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with political psychological theory and research in an attempt to demonstrate how political psychologists think about human behavior. We will examine major topics as covered in mainstream western literature, but we will also focus on political psychology research in the Arab region.

PSYC661 Cross-Cultural Psychology

Inter-personal differences in a range of basic psychological processes exist within and between-cultures. Cultural diversity exists in most world countries. Such diversity may introduce challenges to societies as well as bring benefits and opportunities for development. It is important for social professionals to understand the ways culture contributes to similarities and differences between people. Cultural psychology is the scientific study of the ways social norms, socialization, and cultural values shape our self-understanding and our understanding of others. This course provides students with an extensive knowledge of the phenomena cultural psychology investigates and theories and interpretations it provides. It aims at consolidating students’ understanding of what makes cross-cultural psychology a distinct field of study and the different methods of cross-cultural psychological research. Besides, students will develop familiarity with the wide classic and contemporary topics of interest to cross-cultural psychologists, and they will acquire vital skills for explanation and application of key cultural psychology concepts to describe, analyse, and interpret cultural/social psychological phenomena.

PSYC697 Child & Adult Development

Humans develop and change from conception until death. In this class, we will examine the core theories and a selection of important concepts in developmental psychology, including both social development and cognitive development. This class will follow a topical approach rather than a chronological approach to developmental psychology, but students will have the opportunity to follow a topic of interest across the lifespan in their final paper

 Core Courses

PSYC613 Ethics, Practice, and Professional Issues

To understand general psychological ethical principles and professional guidelines, to learn to use existing ethical decision-making models to guide behavior generally and specifically when providing clinical services, and to become familiar with local, regional, and international codes of ethics. This course will examine topics such as confidentiality, ethical competence, professional relationships, and boundaries. Emphasis will be placed upon rights, duties, and professional responsibilities. The style is dialectical, requiring identification of the ethical issues, discussion, and understanding how to approach new issues to engage in ethical best practice.

PSYC615B Psychopathology

This course offers an advanced introduction to the field of child and adolescent psychopathology. It will review the diagnoses with their criteria, etiology, developmental course, detailed descriptions, and prevention of major behavior disorders in childhood and adolescence. Core emphases include a vocabulary of relevant terminologies, understanding children's symptoms within the developmental and social contexts in which they occur, and using research knowledge to inform our ability to treat or prevent childhood disorders.

PSYC621A Clinical Interventions I

This two-part course is designed to critically examine the historical/theoretical frameworks that major forms of psychotherapy interventions utilize. Some of the theoretical perspectives may include: (but are not limited to) Person-Centered (Humanistic), Existential, Adlerian, Behavioral, Cognitive-Behavioral, Gestalt, Multimodal, and Systems theory. In addition, the course will cover topics, such as general issues in psychotherapy and treatment of various psychological disorders.

PSYC617B Assessment (Cognitive)

This seminar offers an introduction to the theoretical and practical issues related to cognitive assessment, exposure to the administration, scoring, limitations, and interpretation of several principal cognitive assessments, and development of report writing skills

PSYC619 Biological Bases of Psychopathology (Neuroscience of Mental Disorders)

The course addresses the following topics & subjects: - Neuroscience: Past, Present, and Future - The Structure of the Nervous System - Neurotransmitter Systems - Molecular Mechanisms of Learning and Memory - Brain Rhythms and Sleep - Chemical Control of the Brain and Behavior. - Brain Mechanisms of Emotion & Motivation. - Biology of the abnormal behaviors and brain diseases: developmental disorders, epilepsy &, psychotic disorders.

PSYC614 Advanced Social Psychology

1. This course is intended to provide an introductory graduate-level survey of the content, theories, research paradigms, and findings of the field of social psychology. The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with social psychological theory and research in an attempt to demonstrate how social psychologists think about human behavior. We will examine major topics of classic nature in social psychology as covered in mainstream western literature while also providing exposure to cross-cultural psychological research including literature from the Arab region.

PSYCH617A Clinical Assessment (Personality/Psychological)

This course provides a general outline of the larger clinical assessment issues as well as specific stages in the assessment process related to personality tests. The approach is to integrate recent scientific knowledge with clinical practice addressing both technical and human side of psychological assessment. Tests that are more useful in local contexts are highlighted. One aspect of this course is teaching students to apply tests and interviews in class (or preferably in clinical setting) and write a psychological report for presentation in class and do triangulation for the data that came from interview and observation and testing for the case.

PSYCH 623 A/B Practicum I/II

Clinical practice in clinical psychology includes placement in a program-approved, supervised clinical training setting. To ensure a balance between theoretical and practicum learning and to facilitate student progress in meeting the research and other program requirements, students are asked to place a reasonable limit on clinical practicum activities. The purpose of this practicum is to develop a student’s ability to integrate theory and empirical evidence to competently deliver evidence-based therapies. It would also consist of discussions of evidence-based psychotherapy practice, supervision, and self-reflection of the therapeutic process.

PSYC 624 Internship

This course consists of supervised field work with a community agency, organization, or professional that is separate from their other coursework requirements. Each student will be under the direct supervision of an individual faculty member as well as an on-site supervisor. This field work can be an applied research project (usually some aspect of problem assessment or program evaluation) and/or it can be substantial involvement in ongoing program planning or program development.

PSYC 001 Writing in the Psychological Sciences

The goal of this course is to prepare students to write their theses, design research, write future academic papers, and write at a level that is acceptable in other future professional and practical endeavors. In all cases, the emphasis will be on developing scientific writing skills within the framework of psychology as a discipline. The course focuses on writing activities with minimal reading. We will focus on the importance of selecting appropriate scholarly material, developing arguments, writing clearly, APA format and style, and self and other revision in our writing.

PSYC 615A Adult Psychopathology

overviews, case studies, and examination of individual disorders in an accessible format that facilitates easy reference. This course focuses on the critical link between psychopathology and psychotherapy. More specifically, it links diagnostic evaluation, case conceptualization, and treatment selection to psychotherapy practice. Broad-reaching issues such as interviewing and cross-cultural considerations are discussed for their effect on the clinical presentation of every disorder and case studies illustrate how diagnoses are reached and applied in real-world settings.

PSYC 621B Clinical Interventions II

The course combines the many schools of thought on psychotherapy that coaches future psychotherapists through the various techniques needed as the field expands. The course considers all of the simultaneous advances in the field, including the neurobiology of emotions, the importance of the therapeutic relationship, mindfulness meditations, and the role of the body in healing. Including respect for all traditions from cognitive behavioral therapy to psychodynamics, the course unifies views of psychopathology and cure based on the notion of the mind-brain as an organ of affect regulation. The course accounts for the tasks that characterize psychotherapist activity in all therapies, how they are performed, and how they result in therapeutic change. The course also reviews the various pathologies seen in general practice and guides the student to the specific therapist-patient interactions needed for their resolution.

PSYC620 Current Issues in Social & Applied Psychology

Applied social psychology combines the science of social psychology with the practical application of solving social problems that exist in the real world. This course focuses on various challenges that social psychology can help to address (e.g., promoting behavior change, well-being, managing diversity, leadership, communication, increasing justice and cooperation, or understanding social change). The course will focus on the use of social psychological research paradigms to evaluate theory-based applications in areas such as physical and mental health, organizational issues, political behavior, inter-group relations and prejudice, environmental issues, and education. Social psychological research has discovered basic human tendencies, like the tendency to conform to social norms, and has also produced a vast array of applied studies that help addressing urgent topics from a social-psychological perspective. The present course helps students apply basic principles from social psychology to their field of interest, and to find, understand, interpret and use more specialized, applied research findings.